Beating off the waves – Negotiating the narrow streets

The sun was starting to set – glistening on the golden dome of a large mosque on the other side of the square.  So we ambled back to the hotel and observed the first of many rush hours in Male that I was to experience that week.  The pavements are narrow and often obstructed by constructions, piles of waste, the odd vehicle parked up, or shop wares on display.  So we had to zigzag from street to sidewalk and watch out for all the other traffic around.  There were many small cars and trucks and the occasional bus, but mostly it was mopeds and motorcycles.  We often walked single file , trying not to knock over the stack of bikes parked up on the roadside.  As people left their places of work, they did what so many workers do – they hurry home, they pick up some last minute shopping items – either that key ingredient for the evening meal, or something for the house that will help them clean, entertain, relax, sleep.  Others went to exercise before the night came on – frantic football matches on the small patches of sports fields around the southern part of the island.

While it was familiar, two things crossed my mind as we transected through the streets.  One was the intensity of activity in these narrow streets.  The second was that whatever the commuting was to be done, it would only be a small distance before people reached their destination, given the island was barely a mile across.  I was to be proved wrong on that one later.

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One way to commute

We ate at a small restaurant a couple of streets away.  Being in an open courtyard it gave us some fresher air to sit in, but the height of the buildings around both was claustrophobic and allowed the noise of all the clients resound against the concrete.  Maldives being a strictly Muslim country, alcohol was not on any menus; indeed only in secluded tourist resorts could you access as much as a beer.  So I got used to teas, cordials and sharp acidic lemonades.  All of which were remarkably refreshing in the humid heat in the city.

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